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Biography

Background

Stieg's grandfather, an inspiring role model

Stieg Larsson was born in Västerbotten in northern Sweden in 1954. At the time of his birth, his parents were too young and too poor to keep him, so he was raised by his grandparents in a small village in the north of Sweden. Stieg's grandfather, Severin Boström, became the male role model for the young Stieg. Severin was strongly anti-fascist (and during the Second World War he was imprisoned in the work camp in Storsien for his anti-Nazi opinions)*. Had he been Danish, he would no doubt have been placed in a German Concentration Camp. The fate of his grandfather deeply affected and shaped Stieg's character. He wanted to protect equal rights and fight for democracy and freedom of speech in order to prevent history, and what happened to his grand father, from repeating itself.

* Stieg's father, Erland Larsson, says to stieglarsson.com that nobody in the family can confirm the information about the camp.

Youth, left-wing movement and far travels

When Stieg was nine years old, his grandfather died and he moved to live with his parents and his younger brother. Stieg was given a typewriter for his 12th birthday, and he spent most nights of his youth staying up writing, keeping his family awake with the drumming sound. At 18 years of age he met Eva Gabrielsson at an anti-Vietnam War meeting in Umeå. Eva was to become his life long companion. With some short exceptions, mainly due to the fact that Stieg was sometimes too obsessed with his work, they lived together until Stiegs death the 9th November 2004. After his military service, Stieg travelled in Africa and has been described as "an early backpacker". He rarely had enough money on his travels, in an interview with Norra Västerbotten in 2006, his father describes how he had to work as a dishwasher and sell his clothes to afford a ticket home from Algeria.

Stieg Larsson was also interested in Science Fiction. Among other things was he the chairman of the Scandinavian science fiction society and published two magazines.

A life under constant threat

During the last 15 years of his life, he and his life companion Eva Gabrielsson lived under constant threat from right-wing violence. When a labor-union leader was murdered in his home by neo-Nazis in 1999, the police discovered photos of and information about the couple in the murderer's apartment. So it was not without reason that the couple took precautionary measures. They were never seen together outside the house, they moved mirrors in the hall and they always kept the blinds down. Those are just a few examples. Stieg was an expert in the area, and wrote a book of instructions on how journalists should respond to threats for the Swedish Union of Journalists ("Överleva Deadline", 2000).

Writing as a relaxation

The situation created a contrast between Stieg's work at Expo and his night-time novel writing. He regarded his writing of detective novels as relaxing. Keeping track of loose ends, characters and made up conspiracies posedno problem since it was, after all, fiction and no one would threaten either Eva or himself because of it.

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Have thoroughly enjoyed all 3 books. I didn't want to finish them but couldn't put them down. Such a shame we have lost an author of his ability. I did get confused with the Swedish names but that comes from being an English speaker. Thank you Stieg for such great books.

- Trishaws Williams, NZ, 15 November 2014

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30.10.2014

Hi I'm on the' Hornets Nest I find the build up of his story telling quite different from anything I've read before. I loved finishing 'Played with Fire' and starting

Hornets Nest it was like turning to the next chapter. Being from N. Ireland I tended to find the names of locations and people a bit distracting but after the 1st book decided to stop trying to pronounce them! Loved the books - only recently found out that he had died - have'nt yet found any details - so young so talented - Noeleen Hughes

- , 31 October 2014

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After some (unecessary,but necessary at the same time!) deliberation, decided to read a wee bit more...when you gasp,sigh and talk to yourself out loud about what you just read, then, yea, you can finally go to bed, knowing you can get some sleep before the next instalment. Can't wait till tomorrow!

- Reme Hcnyl, 16 October 2014

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It's 2:28am, and I cannot put The Girl Who Played With Fire down... I'm not the fastest reader but love reading and, as with the first in this trilogy, I am annoyed that I have to interrupt the book with work and whatever else I am supposed to be getting on with..! At page 550 & have to be up in a 4 hours.... At my age,(late 30's), why isn't it an acceptable excuse to tell the truth that "I'm not sick, I just want the day off to find out what happens next??!

- Reme Hcnyl, 16 October 2014

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I am saddened by the untimely death of such a brilliant author. Outside of the literary comments I would like to touch on the personal and hope and pray that his father and brother would do the right thing and share the inheritance with Stieg's life long partner Eva. Stieg's loved her and would want you to do the right thing. If you do not this financial gain will bring you continuous problems. It has been 10 years since his death and I might be out of line not knowing that you have already done the right thing. Written with love and blessings.

- Anne Ardell, 13 October 2014

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the girl with the dragon tattoo. i listen to it with ear phones, i have been listening to books for 10 years as my eyesight is not as it should be. It is the only book i listened to without interruption. I just could not put it down until i finished. never have i done that before or since. needless to say i immediately purchased the next 2 audio books. such a loss. to go so young.

- jls19456@gmail.com, 8 October 2014

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The chaotic feel of the books was so well reflected in his real life! Incredible author

- Jack, 1 October 2014

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excellent enjoyed it very much

- lynn, 30 September 2014

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Such a great loss. I'm reading The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest and loving it. I want it to last forever but get to the ending, too! His description of the different towns and cities in Sweden is fascinating and so precise -- the names of the cafes and foodstuffs add another layer of interest in an amazing trilogy. Character development is phenomenal. I'll be sad when I'm done but at least I'll get some sleep then. For now, I'm losing plenty of that.

- KayMc, 27 September 2014

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Am just starting the third novel of his Lisbeth Salander series, brilliant! Too bad to loose such s talent and activest.

- , 26 August 2014

I, too am reading the third novel, The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest. What an extraordinary man, Stieg Larsson was. His methods of twisting & turning a plot is indeed brillant!! Almost don't want the story to end. Cheers--that he gave the world so much in his short life!!!

- Katyhleen, 3 September 2014

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